Cornerstone Speech

Pagina 1 di 2 1, 2  Seguente

Vedere l'argomento precedente Vedere l'argomento seguente Andare in basso

Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Abolizionista il Gio 30 Set 2010 - 0:03

Testo(in inglese) del famigerato discorso di Alexander Stephens sulla schiavitù.
Discorso generalmente tralasciato dagli apologeti della Confederazione.
Mentre invece illustra molto bene le profonde fondamenta ideologiche dei CSA.
Ho evidenziato in neretto i tratti del discorso che riguardano la schiavitù e la secessione.
In rosso una traduzione veloce(scusate se ho mancato, tipo nell'ultimo paragrrafo, la traduzione giusta.

Cornerstone Speech
Alexander H. Stephens

March 21, 1861
Savannah, Georgia

When perfect quiet is restored, I shall proceed. I cannot speak so long as there is any noise or confusion. I shall take my time I feel quite prepared to spend the night with you if necessary. I very much regret that everyone who desires cannot hear what I have to say. Not that I have any display to make, or anything very entertaining to present, but such views as I have to give, I wish all, not only in this city, but in this State, and throughout our Confederate Republic, could hear, who have a desire to hear them.

I was remarking that we are passing through one of the greatest revolutions in the annals of the world. Seven States have within the last three months thrown off an old government and formed a new. This revolution has been signally marked, up to this time, by the fact of its having been accomplished without the loss of a single drop of blood.

This new constitution. or form of government, constitutes the subject to which your attention will be partly invited. In reference to it, I make this first general remark: it amply secures all our ancient rights, franchises, and liberties. All the great principles of Magna Charta are retained in it. No citizen is deprived of life, liberty, or property, but by the judgment of his peers under the laws of the land. The great principle of religious liberty, which was the honor and pride of the old constitution, is still maintained and secured. All the essentials of the old constitution, which have endeared it to the hearts of the American people, have been preserved and perpetuated. Some changes have been made. Some of these I should have preferred not to have seen made; but other important changes do meet my cordial approbation. They form great improvements upon the old constitution. So, taking the whole new constitution, I have no hesitancy in giving it as my judgment that it is decidedly better than the old.

Allow me briefly to allude to some of these improvements. The question of building up class interests, or fostering one branch of industry to the prejudice of another under the exercise of the revenue power, which gave us so much trouble under the old constitution, is put at rest forever under the new. We allow the imposition of no duty with a view of giving advantage to one class of persons, in any trade or business, over those of another. All, under our system, stand upon the same broad principles of perfect equality. Honest labor and enterprise are left free and unrestricted in whatever pursuit they may be engaged. This old thorn of the tariff, which was the cause of so much irritation in the old body politic, is removed forever from the new.

Again, the subject of internal improvements, under the power of Congress to regulate commerce, is put at rest under our system. The power, claimed by construction under the old constitution, was at least a doubtful one; it rested solely upon construction. We of the South, generally apart from considerations of constitutional principles, opposed its exercise upon grounds of its inexpediency and injustice. Notwithstanding this opposition, millions of money, from the common treasury had been drawn for such purposes. Our opposition sprang from no hostility to commerce, or to all necessary aids for facilitating it. With us it was simply a question upon whom the burden should fall. In Georgia, for instance, we have done as much for the cause of internal improvements as any other portion of the country, according to population and means. We have stretched out lines of railroads from the seaboard to the mountains; dug down the hills, and filled up the valleys at a cost of not less than $25,000,000. All this was done to open an outlet for our products of the interior, and those to the west of us, to reach the marts of the world. No State was in greater need of such facilities than Georgia, but we did not ask that these works should be made by appropriations out of the common treasury. The cost of the grading, the superstructure, and the equipment of our roads was borne by those who had entered into the enterprise. Nay, more not only the cost of the iron no small item in the aggregate cost was borne in the same way, but we were compelled to pay into the common treasury several millions of dollars for the privilege of importing the iron, after the price was paid for it abroad. What justice was there in taking this money, which our people paid into the common treasury on the importation of our iron, and applying it to the improvement of rivers and harbors elsewhere? The true principle is to subject the commerce of every locality, to whatever burdens may be necessary to facilitate it. If Charleston harbor needs improvement, let the commerce of Charleston bear the burden. If the mouth of the Savannah river has to be cleared out, let the sea-going navigation which is benefited by it, bear the burden. So with the mouths of the Alabama and Mississippi river. Just as the products of the interior, our cotton, wheat, corn, and other articles, have to bear the necessary rates of freight over our railroads to reach the seas. This is again the broad principle of perfect equality and justice, and it is especially set forth and established in our new constitution.

Another feature to which I will allude is that the new constitution provides that cabinet ministers and heads of departments may have the privilege of seats upon the floor of the Senate and House of Representatives and may have the right to participate in the debates and discussions upon the various subjects of administration. I should have preferred that this provision should have gone further, and required the President to select his constitutional advisers from the Senate and House of Representatives. That would have conformed entirely to the practice in the British Parliament, which, in my judgment, is one of the wisest provisions in the British constitution. It is the only feature that saves that government. It is that which gives it stability in its facility to change its administration. Ours, as it is, is a great approximation to the right principle.

Under the old constitution, a secretary of the treasury for instance, had no opportunity, save by his annual reports, of presenting any scheme or plan of finance or other matter. He had no opportunity of explaining, expounding, enforcing, or defending his views of policy; his only resort was through the medium of an organ. In the British parliament, the premier brings in his budget and stands before the nation responsible for its every item. If it is indefensible, he falls before the attacks upon it, as he ought to. This will now be the case to a limited extent under our system. In the new constitution, provision has been made by which our heads of departments can speak for themselves and the administration, in behalf of its entire policy, without resorting to the indirect and highly objectionable medium of a newspaper. It is to be greatly hoped that under our system we shall never have what is known as a government organ.

Another change in the constitution relates to the length of the tenure of the presidential office. In the new constitution it is six years instead of four, and the President rendered ineligible for a re-election. This is certainly a decidedly conservative change. It will remove from the incumbent all temptation to use his office or exert the powers confided to him for any objects of personal ambition. The only incentive to that higher ambition which should move and actuate one holding such high trusts in his hands, will be the good of the people, the advancement, prosperity, happiness, safety, honor, and true glory of the confederacy.

But not to be tedious in enumerating the numerous changes for the better, allow me to allude to one other though last, not least. The new constitution has put at rest, forever, all the agitating questions relating to our peculiar institution African slavery as it exists amongst us the proper status of the negro in our form of civilization. This was the immediate cause of the late rupture and present revolution.[La nuova costituzione ha messo fine, per sempre, a tutte le agitazioni dovute alla nostra peculiare istituzione, la schiavitù dei neri è sempre stata la condizione del negro nella nostra civiltà, questa è la causa del l'ultima rottura e presente rivoluzione] Jefferson in his forecast, had anticipated this, as the "rock upon which the old Union would split." He was right. What was conjecture with him, is now a realized fact. But whether he fully comprehended the great truth upon which that rock stood and stands, may be doubted. The prevailing ideas entertained by him and most of the leading statesmen at the time of the formation of the old constitution, were that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of nature; that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally, and politically. It was an evil they knew not well how to deal with, but the general opinion of the men of that day was that, somehow or other in the order of Providence, the institution would be evanescent and pass away. This idea, though not incorporated in the constitution, was the prevailing idea at that time. The constitution, it is true, secured every essential guarantee to the institution while it should last, and hence no argument can be justly urged against the constitutional guarantees thus secured, because of the common sentiment of the day. Those ideas, however, were fundamentally wrong. They rested upon the assumption of the equality of races. [Queste idee, comunque erano fondamentalmente sbagliate. Esse si basavano sull'assunzione dell'uguaglianza delle razze] This was an error. It was a sandy foundation, and the government built upon it fell when the "storm came and the wind blew."

Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea; its foundations are laid, its corner- stone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery subordination to the superior race is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth. [Il nostro nuovo governo è fondato esattamente sullidea opposta, le sue fondamenta sono posate, la sua pietra angolare è, la grande verità che il negro non è uguale all'uomo bianco; che la subordinazione schiavistica ad una razza superiore è la sua naturale e normale condizione. Questo nostro nuovo governo, è il primo nella storia del mondo basato su questa grande verità, fisica, filosofica e morale]This truth has been slow in the process of its development, like all other truths in the various departments of science. It has been so even amongst us. Many who hear me, perhaps, can recollect well, that this truth was not generally admitted, even within their day. The errors of the past generation still clung to many as late as twenty years ago. Those at the North, who still cling to these errors, with a zeal above knowledge, we justly denominate fanatics. All fanaticism springs from an aberration of the mind from a defect in reasoning. It is a species of insanity. One of the most striking characteristics of insanity, in many instances, is forming correct conclusions from fancied or erroneous premises; so with the anti-slavery fanatics. Their conclusions are right if their premises were. They assume that the negro is equal, and hence conclude that he is entitled to equal privileges and rights with the white man. If their premises were correct, their conclusions would be logical and just but their premise being wrong, their whole argument fails. I recollect once of having heard a gentleman from one of the northern States, of great power and ability, announce in the House of Representatives, with imposing effect, that we of the South would be compelled, ultimately, to yield upon this subject of slavery, that it was as impossible to war successfully against a principle in politics, as it was in physics or mechanics. That the principle would ultimately prevail. That we, in maintaining slavery as it exists with us, were warring against a principle, a principle founded in nature, the principle of the equality of men. The reply I made to him was, that upon his own grounds, we should, ultimately, succeed, and that he and his associates, in this crusade against our institutions, would ultimately fail. The truth announced, that it was as impossible to war successfully against a principle in politics as it was in physics and mechanics, I admitted; but told him that it was he, and those acting with him, who were warring against a principle. They were attempting to make things equal which the Creator had made unequal.

In the conflict thus far, success has been on our side, complete throughout the length and breadth of the Confederate States. It is upon this, as I have stated, our social fabric is firmly planted; and I cannot permit myself to doubt the ultimate success of a full recognition of this principle throughout the civilized and enlightened world.

As I have stated, the truth of this principle may be slow in development, as all truths are and ever have been, in the various branches of science. It was so with the principles announced by Galileo it was so with Adam Smith and his principles of political economy. It was so with Harvey, and his theory of the circulation of the blood. It is stated that not a single one of the medical profession, living at the time of the announcement of the truths made by him, admitted them. Now, they are universally acknowledged. May we not, therefore, look with confidence to the ultimate universal acknowledgment of the truths upon which our system rests? It is the first government ever instituted upon the principles in strict conformity to nature, and the ordination of Providence, in furnishing the materials of human society. Many governments have been founded upon the principle of the subordination and serfdom of certain classes of the same race; such were and are in violation of the laws of nature. Our system commits no such violation of nature's laws. With us, all of the white race, however high or low, rich or poor, are equal in the eye of the law. Not so with the negro. Subordination is his place. He, by nature, or by the curse against Canaan, is fitted for that condition which he occupies in our system. The architect, in the construction of buildings, lays the foundation with the proper material-the granite; then comes the brick or the marble. The substratum of our society is made of the material fitted by nature for it, and by experience we know that it is best, not only for the superior, but for the inferior race, that it should be so. It is, indeed, in conformity with the ordinance of the Creator. It is not for us to inquire into the wisdom of His ordinances, or to question them. For His own purposes, He has made one race to differ from another, as He has made "one star to differ from another star in glory." The great objects of humanity are best attained when there is conformity to His laws and decrees, in the formation of governments as well as in all things else. Our confederacy is founded upon principles in strict conformity with these laws. This stone which was rejected by the first builders "is become the chief of the corner" the real "corner-stone" in our new edifice. I have been asked, what of the future? It has been apprehended by some that we would have arrayed against us the civilized world. I care not who or how many they may be against us, when we stand upon the eternal principles of truth, if we are true to ourselves and the principles for which we contend, we are obliged to, and must triumph.

Thousands of people who begin to understand these truths are not yet completely out of the shell; they do not see them in their length and breadth. We hear much of the civilization and Christianization of the barbarous tribes of Africa. In my judgment, those ends will never be attained, but by first teaching them the lesson taught to Adam, that "in the sweat of his brow he should eat his bread," and teaching them to work, and feed, and clothe themselves.

But to pass on: Some have propounded the inquiry whether it is practicable for us to go on with the confederacy without further accessions? Have we the means and ability to maintain nationality among the powers of the earth? On this point I would barely say, that as anxiously as we all have been, and are, for the border States, with institutions similar to ours, to join us, still we are abundantly able to maintain our position, even if they should ultimately make up their minds not to cast their destiny with us. That they ultimately will join us be compelled to do it is my confident belief; but we can get on very well without them, even if they should not.

We have all the essential elements of a high national career. The idea has been given out at the North, and even in the border States, that we are too small and too weak to maintain a separate nationality. This is a great mistake. In extent of territory we embrace five hundred and sixty-four thousand square miles and upward. This is upward of two hundred thousand square miles more than was included within the limits of the original thirteen States. It is an area of country more than double the territory of France or the Austrian empire. France, in round numbers, has but two hundred and twelve thousand square miles. Austria, in round numbers, has two hundred and forty-eight thousand square miles. Ours is greater than both combined. It is greater than all France, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain, including England, Ireland, and Scotland, together. In population we have upward of five millions, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original thirteen States, was less than four millions in 1790, and still less in 76, when the independence of our fathers was achieved. If they, with a less population, dared maintain their independence against the greatest power on earth, shall we have any apprehension of maintaining ours now?

In point of material wealth and resources, we are greatly in advance of them. The taxable property of the Confederate States cannot be less than twenty-two hundred millions of dollars! This, I think I venture but little in saying, may be considered as five times more than the colonies possessed at the time they achieved their independence. Georgia, alone, possessed last year, according to the report of our comptroller-general, six hundred and seventy-two millions of taxable property. The debts of the seven confederate States sum up in the aggregate less than eighteen millions, while the existing debts of the other of the late United States sum up in the aggregate the enormous amount of one hundred and seventy-four millions of dollars. This is without taking into account the heavy city debts, corporation debts, and railroad debts, which press, and will continue to press, as a heavy incubus upon the resources of those States. These debts, added to others, make a sum total not much under five hundred millions of dollars. With such an area of territory as we have-with such an amount of population-with a climate and soil unsurpassed by any on the face of the earth-with such resources already at our command-with productions which control the commerce of the world-who can entertain any apprehensions as to our ability to succeed, whether others join us or not?

It is true, I believe I state but the common sentiment, when I declare my earnest desire that the border States should join us. The differences of opinion that existed among us anterior to secession, related more to the policy in securing that result by co-operation than from any difference upon the ultimate security we all looked to in common.

These differences of opinion were more in reference to policy than principle, and as Mr. Jefferson said in his inaugural, in 1801, after the heated contest preceding his election, that there might be differences of opinion without differences on principle, and that all, to some extent, had been Federalists and all Republicans; so it may now be said of us, that whatever differences of opinion as to the best policy in having a co-operation with our border sister slave States, if the worst came to the worst, that as we were all co-operationists, we are now all for independence, whether they come or not.

In this connection I take this occasion to state, that I was not without grave and serious apprehensions, that if the worst came to the worst, and cutting loose from the old government should be the only remedy for our safety and security, it would be attended with much more serious ills than it has been as yet. Thus far we have seen none of those incidents which usually attend revolutions. No such material as such convulsions usually throw up has been seen. Wisdom, prudence, and patriotism, have marked every step of our progress thus far. This augurs well for the future, and it is a matter of sincere gratification to me, that I am enabled to make the declaration. Of the men I met in the Congress at Montgomery, I may be pardoned for saying this, an abler, wiser, a more conservative, deliberate, determined, resolute, and patriotic body of men, I never met in my life. Their works speak for them; the provisional government speaks for them; the constitution of the permanent government will be a lasting monument of their worth, merit, and statesmanship.

But to return to the question of the future. What is to be the result of this revolution?

Will every thing, commenced so well, continue as it has begun? In reply to this anxious inquiry, I can only say it all depends upon ourselves. A young man starting out in life on his majority, with health, talent, and ability, under a favoring Providence, may be said to be the architect of his own fortunes. His destinies are in his own hands. He may make for himself a name, of honor or dishonor, according to his own acts. If he plants himself upon truth, integrity, honor and uprightness, with industry, patience and energy, he cannot fail of success. So it is with us. We are a young republic, just entering upon the arena of nations; we will be the architects of our own fortunes. Our destiny, under Providence, is in our own hands. With wisdom, prudence, and statesmanship on the part of our public men, and intelligence, virtue and patriotism on the part of the people, success, to the full measures of our most sanguine hopes, may be looked for. But if unwise counsels prevail if we become divided if schisms arise if dissentions spring up if factions are engendered if party spirit, nourished by unholy personal ambition shall rear its hydra head, I have no good to prophesy for you. Without intelligence, virtue, integrity, and patriotism on the part of the people, no republic or representative government can be durable or stable.

We have intelligence, and virtue, and patriotism. All that is required is to cultivate and perpetuate these. Intelligence will not do without virtue. France was a nation of philosophers. These philosophers become Jacobins. They lacked that virtue, that devotion to moral principle, and that patriotism which is essential to good government Organized upon principles of perfect justice and right-seeking amity and friendship with all other powers-I see no obstacle in the way of our upward and onward progress. Our growth, by accessions from other States, will depend greatly upon whether we present to the world, as I trust we shall, a better government than that to which neighboring States belong. If we do this, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas cannot hesitate long; neither can Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri. They will necessarily gravitate to us by an imperious law. We made ample provision in our constitution for the admission of other States; it is more guarded, and wisely so, I think, than the old constitution on the same subject, but not too guarded to receive them as fast as it may be proper. Looking to the distant future, and, perhaps, not very far distant either, it is not beyond the range of possibility, and even probability, that all the great States of the north-west will gravitate this way, as well as Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Arkansas, etc. Should they do so, our doors are wide enough to receive them, but not until they are ready to assimilate with us in principle.

The process of disintegration in the old Union may be expected to go on with almost absolute certainty if we pursue the right course. We are now the nucleus of a growing power which, if we are true to ourselves, our destiny, and high mission, will become the controlling power on this continent. To what extent accessions will go on in the process of time, or where it will end, the future will determine. So far as it concerns States of the old Union, this process will be upon no such principles of reconstruction as now spoken of, but upon reorganization and new assimilation. Such are some of the glimpses of the future as I catch them.

But at first we must necessarily meet with the inconveniences and difficulties and embarrassments incident to all changes of government. These will be felt in our postal affairs and changes in the channel of trade. These inconveniences, it is to be hoped, will be but temporary, and must be borne with patience and forbearance.

As to whether we shall have war with our late confederates, or whether all matters of differences between us shall be amicably settled, I can only say that the prospect for a peaceful adjustment is better, so far as I am informed, than it has been. The prospect of war is, at least, not so threatening as it has been. The idea of coercion, shadowed forth in President Lincoln's inaugural, seems not to be followed up thus far so vigorously as was expected. Fort Sumter, it is believed, will soon be evacuated. What course will be pursued toward Fort Pickens, and the other forts on the gulf, is not so well understood. It is to be greatly desired that all of them should be surrendered. Our object is peace, not only with the North, but with the world. All matters relating to the public property, public liabilities of the Union when we were members of it, we are ready and willing to adjust and settle upon the principles of right, equity, and good faith. War can be of no more benefit to the North than to us. Whether the intention of evacuating Fort Sumter is to be received as an evidence of a desire for a peaceful solution of our difficulties with the United States, or the result of necessity, I will not undertake to say. I would feign hope the former. Rumors are afloat, however, that it is the result of necessity. All I can say to you, therefore, on that point is, keep your armor bright and your powder dry.

The surest way to secure peace, is to show your ability to maintain your rights. The principles and position of the present administration of the United States the republican party present some puzzling questions. While it is a fixed principle with them never to allow the increase of a foot of slave territory, they seem to be equally determined not to part with an inch "of the accursed soil." Notwithstanding their clamor against the institution, they seemed to be equally opposed to getting more, or letting go what they have got. They were ready to fight on the accession of Texas, and are equally ready to fight now on her secession. Why is this? How can this strange paradox be accounted for? There seems to be but one rational solution and that is, notwithstanding their professions of humanity, they are disinclined to give up the benefits they derive from slave labor. Their philanthropy yields to their interest. The idea of enforcing the laws, has but one object, and that is a collection of the taxes, raised by slave labor to swell the fund necessary to meet their heavy appropriations. The spoils is what they are after though they come from the labor of the slave

That as the admission of States by Congress under the constitution was an act of legislation, and in the nature of a contract or compact between the States admitted and the others admitting, why should not this contract or compact be regarded as of like character with all other civil contracts liable to be rescinded by mutual agreement of both parties? The seceding States have rescinded it on their part, they have resumed their sovereignty. Why cannot the whole question be settled, if the north desire peace, simply by the Congress, in both branches, with the concurrence of the President, giving their consent to the separation, and a recognition of our independence?

Source: Henry Cleveland, Alexander H. Stephens, in Public and Private: With Letters and Speeches, Before, During, and Since the War (Philadelphia, 1886), pp. 717-729.
[center]
avatar
Abolizionista
Tenente
Tenente

Numero di messaggi : 153
Data d'iscrizione : 25.09.10

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  forrest il Gio 30 Set 2010 - 15:25

Sul fatto che la maggioranza dei sudisti fosse favorevole alla schiavitù,non ci sono dubbi.Credo che su questo punto siamo tutti d'accordo.Ma la tesi secondo la quale il Nord aggredì il Sud per liberare gli schiavi,é una barzelletta che ormai (spero) non venga raccontata + neanche ai bambini delle Elementari.
avatar
forrest
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 1074
Data d'iscrizione : 06.09.08

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Abolizionista il Gio 30 Set 2010 - 15:37

Egregio Generale, dipende da che cosa s'intende per liberazione.
Comunque non è mia intenzione, in questo topic parlare delle cause della ACW, ma piuttosto quale fosse l'ideologia della Confederazione.
avatar
Abolizionista
Tenente
Tenente

Numero di messaggi : 153
Data d'iscrizione : 25.09.10

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  P.G.T. Beauregard il Gio 30 Set 2010 - 17:26

Come dice bene Abolizionista questa non è la discussione giusta per parlare delle cause della guerra, invece chiunque volesse dire la propria al riguardo può farlo nella sezione "Verso la guerra civile", calmi e tranquilli come nei giorni passati.

Ciao

_________________
[Devi essere iscritto e connesso per vedere questa immagine]
La Guerra Civile Americana: l'epica lotta di una casa divisa
avatar
P.G.T. Beauregard
Amministratore - Generale in Capo
Amministratore - Generale in Capo

Numero di messaggi : 2786
Data d'iscrizione : 02.09.08

Vedere il profilo dell'utente http://www.storiamilitare.altervista.org

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Abolizionista il Dom 3 Ott 2010 - 1:29

Stasera sono notturno Smile

The Confederacy Vs The South

Per non aprire un altro topic mi servirò di questo che, bene o male, si adatta.
Come abbiamo visto, Stephens, che rappresentava la classe dirigente della Confederazione esemplifica con questo discorso il pensiero politico sudista.
Ora però, in The Confederate Nation Emory M. Thomas porta alla ribalta una tesi interessante.
Egli, in sostanza, dice che, sebbene la Confederazione sia nata per difendere gli interessi specifici del sud, schiavitù e agri-business in primis, velocemente, spinta dalla guerra ha praticamente creato una corto circuito logico.
Infatti divenne velocemente chiaro, a chi aveva occhi per vedere, che se i CSA volevano diventare parte della famiglia delle nazioni avrebbero dovuto abbandonare o in qualche modo tradire proprio gli ideali(sbagliati o giusti che fossero) che l'avevano spinta anascere.

Thomas analizza i vari punti e fa subito notare che la Confederazione dovette applicare delle misure rigide e limitative delle libertà personali e degli stati(tanto che il governo di Richmond si mise in urto con diversi degli stati membri), un industrializzazione forzata e da ultimo perfino intaccare quella Corner Stone di cui sopra.

Lo storico poi ci porta nella mente dei padri fondatori della CSA e ci mostra come stessero tentando di creare un patriottismo ed un nazionalismo che si sforzasse di superare il sezionalismo schiavista per emergere come vero sentimento nazionale.

La storia ha visto fallire in maniera spettacolare la Confederazione e questo fallimento è imputabile a molte cose(a breve la recensione di Why the south lost the war), la mia idea è però questa; idea che Thomas sembra suggerire: NOn è che alla fine si sia creato un corto circuito tra il sud e la Confederazione?
Spiegandomi meglio: La Confederazione voleva l'indipendenza ma, man mano che la guerra procedeva, ci si è accorti(chi più chi meno) che il prezzo per l'indipenza era l'anima del sud?

avatar
Abolizionista
Tenente
Tenente

Numero di messaggi : 153
Data d'iscrizione : 25.09.10

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  George H. Thomas il Lun 4 Ott 2010 - 13:28

Un post veramente interessante, e mi congratulo con Abolizionista.
Devo dire che le idee esposte da Stephens non sarebbero state fuori luogo nelle opinioni esposte da un moderato nordista o sudista prima e durante la guerra. Curioso come quando la Confederazione è diventata realtà, sono saliti al potere i moderati come Davis e Stephens, e non i radicali, come William Yancey...

George Thomas
avatar
George H. Thomas
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 796
Data d'iscrizione : 15.12.08
Età : 29
Località : Camporosso (IM)

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Abolizionista il Mer 6 Ott 2010 - 18:29

Mi permetto di dissentire.
Sebbene il razzismo fosse diffuso a nord come a sud, nel nord non si istutizionalizzò mai la schiavitù come fondamenta su cui formare la nazione, anzì accadde essattamemte l'opposto.
avatar
Abolizionista
Tenente
Tenente

Numero di messaggi : 153
Data d'iscrizione : 25.09.10

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Discorso della Pietra d'Angolo - parte 1

Messaggio  Jubal Anderson Early il Ven 16 Mar 2012 - 9:34

Poichè non si dica che un apologeta della Confederazione tralasci questo discorso, ne offro la mia traduzione integrale in Italiano. Tra parentesi quadra trovate le minime integrazioni e/o interpolazioni necessarie, non presenti nell'originale, che ho aggiunto al testo per renderlo più chiaramente comprensibile. Il testo, per la sua lunghezza, sarà suddiviso in varie parti.

Discorso della Pietra d'Angolo

(Nota al Titolo : l'espressione può essere intesa facilmente come metaforica: cornerstone, in Inglese significa certamente "pietra d'angolo" e anche "fondamento". Aver tradotto il titolo come "discorso del fondamento" avrebbe reso sicuramente giustizia all'intento programmatico, didascalico del discorso, ma avrebbe allontanato dal cogliere la metafora su cui si impernia tutto il significato del testo. Per questo motivo, ho quindi preferito la versione, più letterale, di: "discorso della pietra d'angolo".)

Quando tornerà il completo silenzio, potrò procedere. Non posso parlare finchè c'è rumore o confusione. Prederò il mio tempo, e sono pronto a passare la notte con voi, se sarà necessario. Mi dispiace davvero che quanti desiderino ascoltare, non possano sentire quanto ho da dire. Non che debba far vedere qualcosa, o che abbia qualcosa di molto divertente da raccontare, ma vorrei che tutti potessero ascoltare, qualora desiderassero farlo, tali opinioni quali esporrò, non solo in questa città, ma in questo Stato, e in tutta la Repubblica Confederata.

Dicevo che stiamo attraversando una delle maggiori rivoluzioni negli annali del mondo. Sette Stati, negli ultimi tre mesi, hanno rigettato il vecchio governo e ne hanno formato uno nuovo. Questa rivoluzione è stata connotata, finora, dal fatto che tutto è stato raggiungo senza alcuno spargimento di sangue.

Questa nuova Costituzione, o forma di governo, è l'oggetto a cui la vostra attenzione viene richiamata. In riferimento a questo, pronuncio questa prima affermazione: essa assicura ampiamente tutti i nostri vecchi diritti, le nostre franchigie e la nostra libertà. Vi sono inclusi tutti i grandi princìpi della Magna Charta. Nessun cittadino viene privato di vita, libertà o proprietà, se non dal giudizio dei suoi pari sotto la giurisdizione dello Stato. Il grande principio della libertà religiosa, onore e orgoglio della vecchia Costituzione, è ancora mantenuto e assicurato. Tutti i principi essenziali della vecchia Costituzione sono conservati e perpetrati. Sono stati apportati alcuni cambiamenti, alcuni dei quali avrei preferito non veder fare, ma altri importanti cambiamenti trovano la mia più sincera approvazione. Essi sono grandi miglioramenti alla vecchia Costituzione. Pertanto, prendendo la nuova Costituzione nel suo insieme, non esito a definirla molto, a mio giudizio, molto migliore della precedente.

Lasciate che accenni brevemente ad alcuni di questi miglioramenti. La questioni dell'accumulo degli interessi di classe, o del promuovere un dato ramo dell'industria a scapito di un altro, nell'esercizio del ricavo - le quali cose ci ha dato tante tribolazioni nella vecchia Costituzione - sono risolte e concluse in quella nuova. Non si permette l'imposizione di alcun obbligo atto ad avvantaggiare una sola classe di persone, in qualsiasi transazione o commercio, a scapito di altri. Ciascuno, nel nostro sistema, è soggetto ai medesimi ampi principi di perfetta eguaglianza. L'onesto lavoro, e l'impresa sono lasciati liberi e non hanno restrizioni ovunque dirigano le loro attività. Questo antico problema delle tariffe, che ha causato tanta irritazione fra la vecchia classe politica, è rimosso per sempre, nella nuova [Costituzione].


Ultima modifica di Jubal Anderson Early il Sab 17 Mar 2012 - 8:14, modificato 3 volte
avatar
Jubal Anderson Early
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 707
Data d'iscrizione : 04.12.11

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Discorso della Pietra d'Angolo - parte 2

Messaggio  Jubal Anderson Early il Ven 16 Mar 2012 - 10:45

Ancora, la questione dei miglioramenti interni, decretati per facoltà del Congresso di regolare il commercio, è chiusa per sempre nel nostro sistema. Il potere, avocato per le opere di costruzione nella vecchia Costituzione, era almeno di dubbia natura, poichè giaceva solo sulla [necessità della] costruzione in sè. Noi del Sud, generalmente avulsi da considerazioni sui principi costituzionali, ci siamo opposti all'esercizio di tale potere, sulla base dell'ingiustizia e dell'inopportunità che lo animano. Nonostante questa opposizione, moltissimo denaro dell'erario è stato speso a questi scopi. La nostra opposizione non nasceva dall'ostilità al commercio, o alle infrastrutture di cui esso necessita. Per noi il problema sta semplicemente su chi debba sostenerne i costi. In Georgia, per esempio, abbiamo operato in favore dei miglioramenti interni, quanto per ciascuna altra parte del paese, conformemente alla popolazione [che ne beneficia] e ai mezzi [disponibili]. Abbiamo esteso linee ferroviarie che collegano le rive del mare alle montagne, abbiamo scavato colline e colmato le valli per un costo complessivo di non meno di 25 milioni di dollari. Tutto ciò è stato intrapreso per creare uno sbocco, affinchè i prodotti delle zone interne e di quelle occidentali, potessero raggiungere i mercati di tutto il mondo. Nessuno Stato aveva maggior bisogno di questi miglioramenti quanto la Georgia, ma noi non abbiamo chiesto che tali opere venissero compiute mediante appropriazioni dall'erario.
Il costo della livellatura, della messa in opera e dell'allestimento delle nostre strade è stato sostenuto da chi aveva partecipato all'impresa.
Persino il costo del ferro - non poca cosa nel costo complessivo - fu sostenuto allo stesso modo, ma siamo stati costretti a pagare divesi milioni, all'erario, per i diritti di importazione del ferro, dopo che lo stesso minerale era stato pagato all'estero.
Quale ingiustizia è stata volere questo denaro, che la nostra gente ha pagato all'erario, sull'importazione del nostro ferro, e spenderlo per la gestione dei fiumi o dei porti, altrove? Il nocciolo della questione, è porre il commercio sotto la giurisdizione delle singole realtà locali, qualunque sia il costo per i miglioramenti necessari ad esso.
Se il porto di Charleston necessita di un qualche intervento, il commercio di Charleston ne paghi il costo. Se si rende necessario di liberare la foce del fiume Savannah, sia la navigazione che ha beneficiato di quel corso d'acqua, a pagarne i costi. E così si faccia per i fiumi Alabama e Mississippi. Così i prodotti dell'entroterra, il nostro cotone, il frumento, il granoturco, e altri articoli, dovranno sostenere i costi del trasporto ferroviario per raggiungere i mari. Questo è ancora quell'ampio principio di perfetta eguaglianza e giustizia, che viene chiaramente espresso e stabilito nella nostra nuova Costituzione.


Ultima modifica di Jubal Anderson Early il Ven 16 Mar 2012 - 16:09, modificato 1 volta
avatar
Jubal Anderson Early
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 707
Data d'iscrizione : 04.12.11

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Discorso della Pietra d'Angolo - parte 3

Messaggio  Jubal Anderson Early il Ven 16 Mar 2012 - 12:19

Un'altra questione a cui vorrei accennare, è che la nuova Costituzione prevede che i Ministri del Governo, e i Capi dei Dipartimenti, abbiano il privilegio di un seggio al Senato e alla Camera dei Rappresentanti, e abbiano il diritto di partecipare ai dibattiti e alle discussioni sui vari aspetti dell'amministrazione. Avrei desiderato che questo miglioramento andasse oltre, concedendo facoltà al Presidente di scegliere i suoi consiglieri dai membri del Senato e della Camera dei Rappresentanti. Questo sarebbe stato in totale conformità alla tradizione del Parlamento Inglese in quella che è, a mio avviso, la più saggia delle clausole della Costituzione Inglese. E' il solo provvedimento che salvi il governo, conferendogli stabilità e flessibilità nel cambio di amministrazione. La nostra Costituzione, così com'è, è solo una grande approssimazione di un principio corretto.

Nella vecchia Costituzione, un Segretario del Tesoro, ad esempio, non aveva possibilità, salvo nel suo rapporto annuale, di presentare alcuna idea, alcun piano in materia di finanza o altro. Non poteva spiegare, esprimere, applicare, difendere i suoi punti di vista politici. Poteva solo far ricorso ad un intermediario, o a un comunicato. Nel Parlamento Inglese, il Primo Ministro presenta il bilancio, ed è responsabile di fronte alla nazione, di ogni articolo. E se non è difendibile, si dimette prima di subire gli attacchi, come è dovuto. Questo caso sarà di portata limitata nel nostro sistema. Nella nuova Costituzione, vi sono delle clausole in virtù delle quali i nostri Capi di Dipartimento hanno titolo per parlare per sè e per l'amministrazione tutta, a difesa della politica governativa, senza dover ricorrere allo strumento altamente discutibile di un quotidiano. E' altamente auspicabile che col nostro sistema non si debba mai avere ciò che è conosciuto come un organo di stampa ufficiale del governo.

Un altro cambiamento nella Costituzione è relativo alla durata del mandato presidenziale. Nella nuova Costituzione è di sei anni invece di quattro, e il Presidente non è eleggibile per un nuovo mandato. Certamente questa è una modifica volta fortemente alla tutela. Inibirà il Presidente in carica, dalla tentazione di usare il proprio ufficio, o applicare i poteri a lui affidati, per fini di ambizione personale. Il solo incentivo a quella maggiore ambizione che dovrebbe muovere e far agire chi sia investito di tanta responsabilità, deve essere il bene comune, il progresso, la prosperità, la felicità, la sicurezza, l'onore e la vera gloria della Confederazione.

Ma, per non tediarvi con l'elencare i numerosi cambiamenti per il meglio, lasciate che accenni ad un ultimo di questi, ma non ultimo per importanza. La nuova Costituzione ha messo fine, una volta per tutte, a tutti quei problemi, causa di agitazione, relativi alla nostra istituzione peculiare - che è la schiavitù degli Africani, per come esiste tra di noi - e a quale sia la condizione dei negri nello stato attuale della nostra civiltà [orig: nella nostra forma di civiltà]. Questo è stato il motivo scatenante della recente rottura e della corrente rivoluzione. Jefferson, nella sua lungimiranza, l'aveva anticipato come "la roccia dove si spezzerà la vecchia Unione".



Ultima modifica di Jubal Anderson Early il Lun 19 Mar 2012 - 14:41, modificato 2 volte
avatar
Jubal Anderson Early
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 707
Data d'iscrizione : 04.12.11

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Discorso della Pietra d'Angolo - parte 4

Messaggio  Jubal Anderson Early il Ven 16 Mar 2012 - 16:07

Egli era nel giusto. Quel che in lui era congettura, ora è un fatto compiuto. Ma se egli avesse compreso la grande verità su cui quella roccia siede ed è posta, non è certo. Il pensiero fondamentale che ispirava Jefferson, e la maggior parte dei più eminenti politici al tempo della stesura della vecchia Costituzione, era che la schiavitù degli Africani non era in violazione alle leggi della Natura, che era sbagliata in linea di principio, nella società, nella morale e nella politica. Era un male che non sapevano bene come gestire, ma l'opinione comune degli uomini di quel tempo era che in qualche modo la Provvidenza avrebbe fatto terminare quell'istituzione, che sarebbe scomparsa da sola. Quest'idea, benchè non inserita nella Costituzione, era l'idea prevalente in quel tempo. La Costituzione, in verità, assicurava ogni garanzia essenziale all'istituzione stessa, finchè essa fosse permasa, e quindi non si può addurre alcun argomento legittimo contro le garanzie costituzionali così assicurate, motivate dal sentire dei nostri giorni. Queste idee, comunque, erano fondamentalmente sbagliate. Poggiavano sull'assunto dell'eguaglianza delle razze. Questo era un errore. Erano delle fondamenta sulla sabbia, e la forma di governo istituita su di esse, cadde "quando arrivò la tempesta e si levò il vento".

Il nostro nuovo governo è basato sull'idea esattamente opposta, le sue fondamenta giacciono, la sua pietra d'angolo è posta sulla grande verità che il negro non è uguale all'uomo bianco; che la sottomissione in schiavitù a una razza superiore è la sua condizione normale e naturale. Questo nostro nuovo governo, è il primo nella storia del mondo, basato su questa grande verità fisica, filosofica e morale. Tale verità è stata lenta nel suo processo di evoluzione, come tutte le altre verità nei vari ambiti della scienza. E così è stato anche fra di noi. Molti che mi ascoltano, possono forse ricordare bene, che questa verità non era comunemente accettata nemmeno ai loro tempi. Gli errori della generazione passata risalgono almeno a vent'anni fa. Quelli al Nord, che ancora si aggrappano a questi errori con uno zelo che ottenebra la ragione, noi giustamente chiamiamo fanatici. Ogni fanatismo si genera da un'aberrazione della mente, derivato da un difetto del ragionamento. E' una sorta di follia. Chi abbia i più evidenti sintomi di pazzia, in molti casi, arriva a conclusioni corrette da premesse fallaci o sbagliate, e così fanno i fanatici antischiavisti. Le loro conclusioni sono corrette, se lo sono [erano] le loro premesse. Danno per acquisito che i negri siano uguali [ai bianchi], e quindi concludono che essi debbano avere eguali diritti ed eguali privilegi all'uomo bianco. Se le loro premesse fossero state corrette, le loro conclusioni sarebbero logiche e giuste, ma essendo state le loro premesse sbagliate, il loro ragionamento cade per intero. Ricordo di aver sentito una volta, un gentiluomo di uno degli Stati del Nord -persona di grande abilità e influsso - annunciare, nella Camera dei Rappresentanti, in tono solenne, che il Sud sarebbe stato infine costretto a cedere sulla questione della schiavitù, e che era impossibile combattere con successo un principio della politica, così come lo era in fisica, o in meccanica. Il principio avrebbe infine prevalso. E che noi, nel mantenere la schiavitù come esiste fra di noi, stavamo lottando contro un principio fondato sulla Natura: il principio di uguaglianza degli esseri umani. La risposta che diedi a costui fu che, sulla base delle sue argomentazioni, noi [sudisti] avremmo infine prevalso, e che lui con i suoi consimili, nella loro crociata contro le nostre istituzioni, avrebbe infine fallito. Accettavo per buona questa verità : che è impossibile contrastare con successo un principio della politica come della fisica o della meccanica, ma gli dissi che era lui, e chi lo spalleggiava, a lottare contro un principio. Stavano provando a rendere uguali cose che il Creatore aveva reso ineguali.

(continua)
avatar
Jubal Anderson Early
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 707
Data d'iscrizione : 04.12.11

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  George Armstrong Custer il Ven 16 Mar 2012 - 16:49

Caro Early,
complimenti per l'ottima traduzione che stai facendo e per l'idea che hai avuto! Very Happy

_________________
Garry Owen
[Devi essere iscritto e connesso per vedere questa immagine]
avatar
George Armstrong Custer
Moderatore - Tenente-generale
Moderatore - Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 2466
Data d'iscrizione : 30.12.08
Età : 60
Località : Roma

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Generale Meade il Ven 16 Mar 2012 - 21:37

George Armstrong Custer ha scritto:Caro Early,
complimenti per l'ottima traduzione che stai facendo e per l'idea che hai avuto! Very Happy

Mi associo e ringrazio Early per la disponibilità ad un lavoro non semplice.

Meade
avatar
Generale Meade
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 3950
Data d'iscrizione : 14.10.09
Età : 55

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Jubal Anderson Early il Sab 17 Mar 2012 - 8:01

Generale Meade ha scritto:
George Armstrong Custer ha scritto:Caro Early,
complimenti per l'ottima traduzione che stai facendo e per l'idea che hai avuto! Very Happy

Mi associo e ringrazio Early per la disponibilità ad un lavoro non semplice.

Meade

Grazie a Voi, Signori Generali. Penso di terminare il lavoro entro un paio di giorni da oggi. Ammetto che è una delle prose più dense che abbia mai tradotto. Spero che la mia traduzione sia sufficientemente fedele all'originale - benchè determinate perifrasi, o la resa in forma attiva di frasi espresse nell'originale in forma passiva, siano inevitabili per rendere il testo in un Italiano accettabile.
avatar
Jubal Anderson Early
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 707
Data d'iscrizione : 04.12.11

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Benjamin F. Cheatham il Sab 17 Mar 2012 - 8:37

Lavoro stupendo caro Early, aspettiamo con ansia il seguito!

Claudio
avatar
Benjamin F. Cheatham
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 3183
Data d'iscrizione : 04.09.08
Località : Genova

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Discorso della Pietra d'Angolo - parte 5

Messaggio  Jubal Anderson Early il Sab 17 Mar 2012 - 10:04

Finora in questo contesto, il successo è stato dalla nostra parte, ed è stato completo lungo tutta l'estensione e la superficie degli Stati Confederati. E' su questo (sul principio della legittimità della schiavitù, n.d.T.), come ho dichiarato, che si instaura il nostro tessuto sociale, e non posso permettermi di dubitare del successo finale [che verrà da] un pieno riconoscimento di questo principio in tutto il mondo civilizzato e raziocinante.

Come già attestato, la verità di questo principio può essere lenta ad affermarsi, come tutte le altre verità sono state e saranno, nelle diverse materie della scienza. Così fu per i principi enunciati da Galileo, e così fu per i principi di politica economica di Adam Smith. Fu così con Harvey, e la sua teoria della circolazione del sangue. Si può dire che nessuno che esercitasse la professione medica, vivente ai tempi in cui egli svelò quelle verità, fosse pronto ad accettarle. Ma ora, quelle sono universalmente riconosciute. Non possiamo quindi, essere fiduciosi nel generale riconoscimento che verrà, della verità su cui si basa il nostro sistema [di governo]? E' il primo governo creato su principi strettamente conformi alla Natura, ai comandamenti della Provvidenza che ha fornito il necessario per creare la società degli uomini. Molti governi sono stati istituiti sul principio della soggezione in schiavitù di certe classi di uomini della stessa razza, e questo era in violazione alle Leggi della Natura. Il nostro sistema [di governo] non vìola alcuna Legge naturale. Con noi, la razza bianca per intero - alti e bassi, ricchi o poveri - è posta in condizioni di eguaglianza davanti alla Legge. Non è così per i negri. La loro condizione è l'essere assoggettati. Essi, per Natura, o per la maledizione su Canaan (Genesi, 9, 18-29, e nello specifico Genesi, 9, 26-27 : Disse poi : "Benedetto il Signore, Dio di Sem, Canaan sia suo schiavo!Accresca il Signore la stirpe di Iafet, ed questi dimori nelle tende di Sem, Canaan sia suo schiavo!", n.d.T.), sono adatti alla loro condizione nel nostro sistema. L'architetto, nella costruzione degli edifici, crea le fondamenta con la pietra adatta, il granito, aggiunge poi il mattone e il marmo. Il sostrato della nostra società è costituito della materia adatta ad esserlo per Natura, e per esperienza noi sappiamo che ciò è il meglio, non solo per [la razza] superiore, ma anche per la razza inferiore, perchè dovrebbe essere [esattamente] così. Ciò è del tutto in conformità con i comandamenti del Creatore. Non spetta a noi indagare sulla saggezza delle Sue determinazioni, o di metterle in discussione. Per i Suoi fini, ha posto una razza diversa dall'altra, come ha creato "una stella diversa dall'altra nella loro gloria". I grandi obbiettivi dell'umanità sono più facilmente conseguiti quando c'è conformità alle Leggi e ai decreti del Signore, e così è per la formazione dei governi, come per tutte le altre cose. La nostra Confederazione si basa su principi in stretta aderenza a queste Leggi. "La pietra scartata dai costruttori, è diventata testata d'angolo", la vera pietra d'angolo del nostro nuovo edificio. Mi è stato chiesto :cosa sarà nel futuro? Alcuni temevano che ci saremmo inimicati il mondo civilizzato. Non mi interessa chi possa essere contro di noi, o quanti possano esserlo. Poichè risiediamo sui principi imperituri di verità, e se restiamo fedeli a noi stessi e a quei principi per i quali combattiamo, noi dobbiamo trionfare per forza.


Ultima modifica di Jubal Anderson Early il Dom 18 Mar 2012 - 11:07, modificato 1 volta
avatar
Jubal Anderson Early
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 707
Data d'iscrizione : 04.12.11

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Jubal Anderson Early il Sab 17 Mar 2012 - 10:12

Benjamin F. Cheatham ha scritto:Lavoro stupendo caro Early, aspettiamo con ansia il seguito!

Claudio

Grazie caro amico! Il tuo incoraggiamento è prezioso.

JAE
avatar
Jubal Anderson Early
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 707
Data d'iscrizione : 04.12.11

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  R.E.Lee il Sab 17 Mar 2012 - 15:52

Caro Early,
1000 grazie per la traduzione!! study study
...era ora che ci fosse qualcuno che pensasse a me! Embarassed Embarassed


Lee
avatar
R.E.Lee
Moderatore - Tenente-generale
Moderatore - Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 3926
Data d'iscrizione : 02.12.08
Età : 55
Località : Montevarchi / Torino

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  George Armstrong Custer il Sab 17 Mar 2012 - 17:45

Riporto- grazie al nostro amico Early- il periodo seguente del discorso di Alexander Stephens che mi ha molto colpito:
"....Il nostro nuovo governo è basato sull'idea esattamente opposta, le sue fondamenta giacciono, la sua pietra d'angolo è posta sulla grande verità che il negro non è uguale all'uomo bianco; che la sottomissione in schiavitù a una razza superiore è la sua condizione normale e naturale. Questo nostro nuovo governo, è il primo nella storia del mondo, basato su questa grande verità fisica, filosofica e morale".

_________________
Garry Owen
[Devi essere iscritto e connesso per vedere questa immagine]
avatar
George Armstrong Custer
Moderatore - Tenente-generale
Moderatore - Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 2466
Data d'iscrizione : 30.12.08
Età : 60
Località : Roma

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Banshee il Sab 17 Mar 2012 - 17:59

Ottimo lavoro caro Early! I miei complimenti.
Cool
Banshee
avatar
Banshee
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 1906
Data d'iscrizione : 17.03.09
Località : La Spezia

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Banshee il Sab 17 Mar 2012 - 18:18

A mio giudizio si tratta di un discorso propagandistico e nulla più. La sua genuinità in alcuni punti è persino dubbia (vedi più sotto). Può riflettere certamente una visione condivisa da una parte della popolazione sudista e nelle intenzioni di Stephens era l'interpretazione più esatta del famoso motto inserito nella Costituzione americana del 1787 ossia che tutti gli uomini di razza bianca sono stati creati uguali, un'interpretazione sposata pure da John C. Calhuon e dalla maggior parte dei costituzionalisti americani dell'epoca. Del resto nel discorso di Jefferson Davis pronunciato all'atto della sua elezione a presidente (discorso pronunciato quello stesso giorno se non erro) non vi è il minimo accenno alla schiavitù.

What I Really Said in the Cornerstone Speech
Alexander Hamilton Stephens
As for my Savanna speech, about which so much has been said and in regrd to which I am represented as setting forth "slavery" as the "corner-stone" of the Confederacy, it is proper for me to state that that speech was extemporaneous, the reporter's notes, which were very imperfect, were hastily corrected by me; and were published without further revision and with several glaring errors. The substance of what I said on slavery was, that on the points under the old Constitution out of which so much discussion, agitation, and strife between the States had arisen, no future contention could arise, as these had been put to rest by clear language. I did not say, nor do I think the reporter represented me as saying, that there was the slightest change in the new Constitution from the old regarding the status of the African race amongst us. (Slavery was without doubt the occasion of secession; out of it rose the breach of compact, for instance, on the part of several Northern States in refusing to comply with Constitutional obligations as to rendition of fugitives from service, a course betraying total disregard for all constitutional barriers and guarantees.)
I admitted that the fathers, both of the North and the South, who framed the old Constitution, while recognizing existing slavery and guarnateeing its continuance under the Constitution so long as the States should severally see fit to tolerate it in their respective limits, were perhaps all opposed to the principle. Jefferson, Madison, Washington, all looked for its early extinction throughout the United States. But on the subject of slavery - so called - (which was with us, or should be, nothing but the proper subordination of the inferior African race to the superior white) great and radical changes had taken place in the realm of thought; many eminent latter-day statesmen, philosophers, and philanthropists held different views from the fathers.

The patriotism of the fathers was not questioned, nor their ability and wisdom, but it devolved on the public men and statesmen of each generation to grapple with and solve the problems of their own times.

The relation of the black to the white race, or the proper status of the coloured population amongst us, was a question now of vastly more importance than when the old Constitution was formed. The order of subordination was nature's great law; philosophy taught that order as the noraml condition of the African amongst European races. Upon this recognized principle of a proper subordination, let it be called slavery or what not, our State institutions were formed and rested. The new Confederation was entered into with this distinct understanding. This principle of the subordination of the inferior to the superior was the "corner-stone" on which it was formed. I used this metaphor merely to illustrate the firm convictions of the framers of the new Constitution that this relation of the black to the white race, which existed in 1787, was not wrong in itself, either morally or politically; that it was in conformity to nature and best for both races. I alluded not to the principles of the new Government on this subject, but to public sentiment in regard to these principles. The status of the African race in the new Constitution was left just where it was in the old; I affirmed and meant to affirm nothing else in this Savannah speech.

My own opinion of slavery, as often expressed, was that if the institution was not the best, or could not be made the best, for both races, looking to the advancement and progress of both, physically and morally, it ought to be abolished. It was far from being what it might and ought to have been. Education was denied. This was wrong. I ever condemned the wrong. Marriage was not recognized. This was a wrong that I condemned. Many things connected with it did not meet my approval but excited my disgust, abhorrence, and detestation. The same I may say of things connected with the best institutions in the best communities in which my lot has been cast. Great improvements were, however, going on in the condition of blacks in the South. Their general physical condition not only as to necessaries but as to comforts was better in my own neighbourhood in 1860, than was that of the whites when I can first recollect, say 1820. Much greater would have been made, I verily believe, but for outside agitation. I have but small doubt that education would have been allowed long ago in Georgia, except for outside pressure which stopped internal reform.

Tratto da:
Recollections of Alexander H. Stephens edited by Myrta Lockett Avary
Originally published by Sunny South Publishing Company and Doubleday, Page & Company, 1910
Louisana State University Press, Baton Rouge, 1998, pp. 173-175.


Banshee
avatar
Banshee
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 1906
Data d'iscrizione : 17.03.09
Località : La Spezia

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Banshee il Sab 17 Mar 2012 - 18:43

George Armstrong Custer ha scritto:Riporto- grazie al nostro amico Early- il periodo seguente del discorso di Alexander Stephens che mi ha molto colpito:
"....Il nostro nuovo governo è basato sull'idea esattamente opposta, le sue fondamenta giacciono, la sua pietra d'angolo è posta sulla grande verità che il negro non è uguale all'uomo bianco; che la sottomissione in schiavitù a una razza superiore è la sua condizione normale e naturale. Questo nostro nuovo governo, è il primo nella storia del mondo, basato su questa grande verità fisica, filosofica e morale".

Per quanto qualcuno possa giudicare con durezza tale idea, all'epoca essa era largamente condivisa anche al Nord e in Europa. Si condannava lo schiavismo, ma non si ammetteva certo l'uguaglianza tra le due razze. E il destino degli afroamericani al Nord, il più delle volte, era solo una forma di schiavismo mascherata. Lo si sfruttava senza pietà nelle grandi fabbriche o in altri ruoli dandogli una parvenza di libertà: un pò quello che si fa ancor oggi con il terzo mondo (Africa e Asia) da parte delle multinazionali.

Banshee
avatar
Banshee
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 1906
Data d'iscrizione : 17.03.09
Località : La Spezia

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Generale Meade il Sab 17 Mar 2012 - 22:30

Banshee ha scritto:A mio giudizio si tratta di un discorso propagandistico e nulla più. La sua genuinità in alcuni punti è persino dubbia (vedi più sotto). Può riflettere certamente una visione condivisa da una parte della popolazione sudista e nelle intenzioni di Stephens era l'interpretazione più esatta del famoso motto inserito nella Costituzione americana del 1787 ossia che tutti gli uomini di razza bianca sono stati creati uguali, un'interpretazione sposata pure da John C. Calhuon e dalla maggior parte dei costituzionalisti americani dell'epoca. Del resto nel discorso di Jefferson Davis pronunciato all'atto della sua elezione a presidente (discorso pronunciato quello stesso giorno se non erro) non vi è il minimo accenno alla schiavitù.



Banshee

Alexander H. Stephens poteva retificare subito. Perchè aspettare?
Che John C. Calhuon sposasse qualunque interpretazione, vera o fasulla, che favorisse la schiavitù, non è che sia una notizia riservata.

Meade
avatar
Generale Meade
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 3950
Data d'iscrizione : 14.10.09
Età : 55

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Banshee il Dom 18 Mar 2012 - 0:01

Riservata (??) o meno che fosse, quella era l'interpretazione che se ne dava in America a livello costituzionale, affermata e sancita pure dalla Corte Suprema. L'uguaglianza formale riguardava i soli cittadini bianchi: tant'è che nessun articolo della costituzione vietava la schiavitù.

Banshee
avatar
Banshee
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 1906
Data d'iscrizione : 17.03.09
Località : La Spezia

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Jubal Anderson Early il Dom 18 Mar 2012 - 8:31

Banshee ha scritto:Ottimo lavoro caro Early! I miei complimenti.
Cool
Banshee

Grazie caro Banshee! Sto continuando la traduzione.
avatar
Jubal Anderson Early
Tenente-generale
Tenente-generale

Numero di messaggi : 707
Data d'iscrizione : 04.12.11

Vedere il profilo dell'utente

Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Re: Cornerstone Speech

Messaggio  Contenuto sponsorizzato


Contenuto sponsorizzato


Tornare in alto Andare in basso

Pagina 1 di 2 1, 2  Seguente

Vedere l'argomento precedente Vedere l'argomento seguente Tornare in alto


 
Permesso di questo forum:
Non puoi rispondere agli argomenti in questo forum